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Interview | Questions & Answers With Feyer

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Feyer
Multi-talented artist Feyer creates interesting genre-bending music, pulling influences from rock, electronica, and video game themes. His musical heroes include Queen, David Bowie, and Talking Heads. Currently, he’s promoting the clip for his new song “Stuck In A Video Game”, which features retro animations, plus a thought-provoking concept. Discover more details in this exclusive interview.

1 — Hello Feyer, thanks for your time. Did you study music production or are you self taught?

A little bit of both. I went to school for music composition mainly, but from there, I got guidance on how to produce electronically and take full advantage of the recording studio. After I graduated, I built my own home recording studio and became more immersed in electronic production. A lot of the little tips and tricks about how to manipulate my DAW, I taught myself (with the help of some YouTube tutorials!).

2 — What makes you so passionate about video games and music?

Funny you should ask. I was never really into video games growing up. It was more so a side hobby for me. I wasn’t allowed to have a gaming console, or even a GameBoy, growing up, so if I ever played video games, they would be at a friend’s house. And since I didn’t have games of my own, I would have nowhere to practice and would suck at the games. What really stuck with me when playing (and usually failing) these games was their awesome soundtracks. Music is my ultimate passion, and since video games often have great soundtracks, I often let them influence my own original material.

3 — Do you want to send out a positive message with your newest single “Stuck In A Video Game”?

The message is more so about life in general than about video games specifically. The skin-deep message is about how as we play these games, we become fully immersed in the characters we take on and it can be difficult to separate real life from what is on the screen. However, when you look deeper into it, you’ll find that the song is a metaphor for life, and how we’re always trying to be the best we can be and achieve next-level success, but there are hurdles we will need to overcome and tools and skills we need to acquire just to get there. Maybe it’s not so positive when you think about it, but I hope that it will provoke thought.

4 — Is banning video games the answer to video game addiction?

Definitely not! If you ban something, won’t it make people just want it more? The idea is about moderation and teaching people that these kinds of things are fine in small doses. It becomes a problem only if people begin to feel as if they can’t live without it, or their lives aren’t complete unless they do this all the time.

5 — Many critics think video games have helped the music industry survive. What’s your opinion?

I agree. As mentioned earlier, something that makes so many games unique are their soundtracks. Since games are being developed at a frequent pace, just like music, developers are always looking for original music for their work. They’re also looking to license pre-existing songs that weren’t made specifically for the games but will fit well with them. These developments in gaming will greatly help musicians creatively and financially and open up new opportunities to get their music out there in ways they may have not thought possible.

feyer music
6 — We know you also produce scores for films. Which is your favorite film soundtrack so far? Why?

At the moment, the Interstellar soundtrack. It’s so simple but so impactful. It really captures the feeling of being trapped in space, while trying to maintain the connection you have to Earth. As far as film scores go, this one is very ambient but has a beautiful theme that stays with you. I also enjoy how Hans Zimmer combines real orchestral sounds with electronic timbres, reinforcing the connection between life on earth and spacious artificial intelligence.

7 — Are you working on your second album or do you prefer to release more single tracks this year?

At the moment, I’m focusing on singles, as they are much easier to promote in the age of streaming. I want each release of mine to achieve its maximum potential, so I’m working on different singles to be released every few months. I am also trying hard to collaborate with other musicians, writers and producers to create tracks that I may not have thought to make just on my own. This way, there’s a stronger sense of community. Be on the lookout for another single, to be released in late May. This one will be quite different than “Stuck in a Video Game” and have more of a rock edge.

feyer interview
8 — Analogs vs. Digital synths. Which one do you prefer?

Digital is what I’m most familiar with, and many of the synths I use are in the box, aka just inside my software. However, although I really dig a lot of the presets at my fingertips, I often try to tweak or combine different sounds so that it doesn’t sound too much like an obvious presets. Despite being less familiar with analog synths, I still have a great interest, as with those, it’s all up to you to manipulate and create the sound. It’s almost like cooking a dish: you need measurements and recipes for creating that perfect patch.

9 — Do you think 8-bit/Chiptune music is for everyone?

It can be if it’s presented the right way, such as when it’s in the background for a popular game, movie, or show, but for people who are more into music with live instruments, whether it be a rock band or an orchestra, 8-bit/Chiptune may be harder to digest. I try not to make straight up chiptune unless I’m asked to for a project, as I still really enjoy the elements and energy of a live rock band. Since I usually play live with a band, I want to do something in the studio that will translate similarly onstage.

10 – Finally, have you ever used cheat codes in order to win hard video games?

Nah, never, because I don’t know any! If I did, I’d probably be using them all the time.


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Hi, my name is Erick Ycaza. I have a BA in Advertising & Graphic Design. This blog is to provide you with daily music news and share my personal style.

Interviews

A Daydream Person Talks New Single “Down In Flames” — Interview

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A Daydream Person Talks New Single “Down In Flames” — Interview

A Daydream Person is probably our favorite emerging producer from South Korea. Discover his catchy Nu-Disco single, “Down In Flames” and the meaning behind it. Without a doubt, his creative energy reflects personal and intimate emotions. Scroll down to read this interesting interview!

1 – I really enjoyed your new single “Down In Flames”. What was the inspiration behind it?

After experiencing countless disappointing relationships, I realized people used me and pretended that they’re nice. I tried my best to make the relationship get better, but didn’t get anything back. Sometimes I punished myself and told myself that it wouldn’t have happened if I was a more attractive person. All these are about my collapsed self-esteem.

2 – Musically speaking, what sets you apart from other artists?

I like to talk about my own self-esteem. When I talk about my self-esteem in my music, which is not too good, not too bad, a lot of people feel it and relate to it. I just realize that there are lots of people that feel the same as me. These days are such a hard time for everyone. People always have to struggle with failures and obstacles. I want to share some feelings with them through my genuine honest vibe. So I think what makes me so special compare to other artists is ‘being honest, real and not pretending’. However, I still root for all artists living around in this desolate world.

3 – What’s the music scene like in Seoul? Is Nu-Disco popular?

Originally in Korea, I think because of ‘Han(한)’, which is kind of feeling refers to deep sadness that can’t be expressed easily if at all, gentle soft music like ballad was so popular. But as K-pop just appeared in the world and developed so fast, we started to get used to electronic music. And after UMF settled down in Korea, music like Big Room and EDM got so popular.

Some people switched their taste into Hip-Hop. I heard there is a growing number of people that actually enjoy the ‘Nu-Disco’ genre, but I guess when I introduce myself as a Nu-Disco artist people wouldn’t know what that is. A genre of music? or cookie brand? They just consider it music that’s usually played by street shops or some cool restaurant.

A Daydream Person
4 – Do you see the K-Pop industry as an obstacle to other local artists that play different styles of music?

No, I don’t think so. K-pop is just only a kind of music, but a huge system or culture. So it seems like many artists that don’t play K-pop think it’s not just their barrier anymore, they just try to cooperate with it. But you know, the position of K-pop is so huge that many musicians are reluctant to try different genres of music and some even just give up.

5 – Whose idea was the use of falsettos on this track? 

Basically it’s Marcus’ idea. Actually, I didn’t know he was such an amazing vocalist until I first heard his track on SoundCloud and suggested to work together. Later, I listened to another track of him, and wow this guy is talented and his falsetto was amazing, so I started mastering right away. I highly recommend you listen to this music. It SLAPS.

6 – How much participation MxRCUS ALEXIS had in the creative process of this song?

Marcus made lyrics and melodies for the music. Originally, I was going to write the lyrics, but when I received the guide melody before the lyrics were completed, I thought it would be better if he writes the lyrics, not me. So I suggested only the overall direction and he worked on the specific part. 

7 – Who is “Down In Flames” dedicated to?

I’d like to dedicate this song to the girl who pretended to be a nice and kind girl on the outside, who was in fact quite the opposite, who lives in Gangnam and likes working out. (She even stole my clothes.)

8 – What’s the message you want to get out with it?

Rather than trying to convey a message to those who live their life pretending to be nice people, which is not true, I just wanted to reveal my
thoughts in the most confident and legal way I could. Actually there’s no place in the world to talk about my innermost thoughts as we think it would be.


9 – Do you have plans of releasing a music video or an album this year?

Actually, I want to make a music video, too. However, I am worried that the quality won’t be as high as I expected, and it is not easy in reality because of the epidemic situations. I’m going to try it when it gets better. Also I aim to release the EP/album within the next year. Hopefully, I don’t get lazy.

10 – Besides music, what else makes you feel happy?

I’m a foodie. I love going out to grab something so yummy. But these days, as you know, I can’t really go out so I just need to settle for delivering food. I guess you guys would think pizza or chicken, but in Korea you can deliver all the food you can think of. Even ice cream and steak.


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Interview With Legacy: Rap, Poetry, New Music & More

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Interview With Legacy: Rap, Poetry, New Music & More
Get to know Legacy, a skillful rapper who dominates the art of poetry like none other. Hailing from Arizona, his songs are gaining a lot of traction with almost 15K streams on SoundCloud. If you are looking for fresh Hip-Hop talents, then scroll down to read this interesting interview.

1 — Can you recall the moment when you thought you could be a rapper?

Honestly, I don’t think I really decided lol. I was writing some poems one day and started learning how to time the syllables to the instrumentals I would find on YouTube and it became something I couldn’t stop doing.

2 — How do you think your hometown has influenced the kind of music that you make?

My hometown influences everything I do, it’s why I’m anxious, depressed, and happy all at the same time. Every day can be good or bad, someone can give me a dirty look one day or trash talk me and I remember the instance and add it to the stories.

3 — What’s so special to you about poetry that you seem to love so genuinely?

Poetry requires you to face the darkest emotions. It makes you think about and actively reflect on everything you do and say. So when I’ve had a bad day, instead of bottling it entirely, I can vent through a verse – which in turn people hear and support my efforts to make it through my everyday life.

Emerging Rapper Legacy Showcases A Poetic Flow On "Bad Feelings"
4 — Where did you take the inspiration to write most of your lyrics?

The inspiration lives in the lifestyle, the good experiences, and the bad.

5 — Do you think a good rapping performance comes from a good rapping technique? If so, what’s yours?

In my opinion, if the fans/listeners are connected to what you’re saying emotionally, and mentally, your performance has achieved its goal. People like having people they can relate to, all I’m doing is bringing those emotions into a poem and instrumental.

6 — Please tell us more about your song “Bad Feelings”. What’s the message behind it?

“Bad Feelings” is actually quite old and I’m just now really pushing for the exposure while my page is still young. However, the message never dies. What I really want people to take away from this song is that no matter what happens, no matter how hard it gets, just keep doing your thing. Time will make it better. Set goals. Keep dreaming. The longer you wait the harder it gets.

7 — As an artist, how do you deal with criticism?

Criticism is everywhere. You can walk a certain way and be judged for it. Listen to the bad things, only sometimes, when they help you improve. And hold the good things close and carry them with you. The good comments and feedback are almost a shield to the bad. They help you realize that one bad comment is one of many other really good ones. So all you can do is keep moving.

8 — Are you afraid to experiment with different music styles?

Yes, and no. It depends on the meaning of “style.” Like, I hate my singing voice but I’m not afraid to try out other flows and techniques.

9 — What are your current projects?

The “Mindset EP.” I’m dropping two more tracks as of right now to finalize the project. “Motion” and another untitled track that I’m working on in collaboration with my newest partner “Yung Cubb”.

10 — Finally, if you weren’t an artist today, what else could you see yourself doing?

Being a pro-CoD player. 💀


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Exclusive Interview: BLACKOYOTE On “Money Honey” Soundtrack

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Exclusive Interview: BLACKOYOTE On "Money Honey" Soundtrack

The soundtrack from BLACKOYOTE for Isaac Knights-Washbourn “Money Honey” short-film is something that deserves your attention. Rich electronic sonic textures + hypnotic beats have always characterized his productions. Learn more right here.

1 — What is your personal philosophy towards working with soundtracks?

My favorite approach depends a lot on who I’m going to work with and the work itself. The most usual, and perhaps what I like the most is to enter a phase in which the film already has a structure and even some shootings. Then, with the director, I can analyze and propose the places where I think music can enter and how music should be. In these cases there is a great interaction with the director and his ideas and expectations. Sometimes it is more complicated, more hard work, but often the work is enriched and enhanced by the team’s ideas. The other way, which was how it happened with Money Honey, I compose the musical theme for the idea of the film and themes for characters and then where and how it enters is done by the editing team with the director. In this case it is a much free approach and more about creating music for ideas and sensations and less about creating to the image and movement. I like both very much. They are different challenges.

2 — Is this the first time you compose music for a film?

No. I have been making music regularly for video and film for many years. No as BLACKOYOTE alter-ego but with my real name. My first soundtrack was in 2011 for the short film Ínsua (http://www.jasg.net/Insua.html).

3 — How did your collaboration begin with the Director and Producers of the short film, “M0ney Honey”?

This was one of the atypical cases. My meeting with Isaac Knights-Washbourn was completely by chance. After a long day of work, I went to have a drink with some friends and I sat next to a friend of a friend from New Zealand. The conversation was flowing, he was in Portugal filming a documentary, and we had many common interests, especially in electronic music. He asked if there was a way to hear my work and said that one day he would contact me. I thought it would be the same as a lot of cases where people talk and to nothing happens. After a few months he sends me an email with the proposal. It was as random as this.

4 — Can you tell us more about the sonic elements that were involved in this soundtrack?

Isaac sends me references about the film’s environment and one of the things that caught my attention was that the film was going to be shot entirely on film, which would give it a natural texture from the analog that reports naturally for a sense of old. So sonically I tried to recreate that texture using analog synthesizers and arpeggiators, a well-textured reverb, and then that altered piano that always reports to the past. I tried to build a balance between old contemporary.

5 — What was the main source of inspiration for this project?

Usually what I do is listen to a lot of music and watch a lot of films that have this style that I want without much concern. It stays in the back of my head, growing. That way ideas come out more easily but without being too glued to the references. In this case I have an idea that I heard a lot of Aphex Twin’s Ambient Works Vol II and Dreu’s 1979 for example.


6 — Would you say this has been your biggest challenge so far?

Not even close. In a good way. Just because everything was very fluid and always fit naturally. My ideas effortlessly stuck to Isaac’s ideas. There is no merit in this. Just a great connection. So there was no special challenge.

7 — How long did the writing and preparation take?

Between the first drafts and the final versions it was about a month. It was a quick process.

8 — Why is this soundtrack relevant to the film?

I think that question would be better answered by Isaac but I think that music helps to put the viewer in the same spirit as the characters. More than a description, it helps to get the sensations. It helps to understand the anguish and the worrying spirit of the precarious situation that suddenly some families are in New Zealand because of the real estate pressure but through a teen skater’s survival instinct.

9 — Was there a brief for this project or they gave you full creative control?

Issac gave me complete freedom. He gave me directions of the aesthetic environment and things he liked but without imposed them. It was only agreed that it would be a theme for the film and variations for the characters. But it was all very fluid.

10 — Lastly, what new projects you got on the horizon?

The pandemic has spoiled a few plans. In the meantime, I finished the soundtrack for a feature film The Last Bath by David Bonneville, which has no release date yet. I would still go with some concerts from the previous album IO and start with a small tour of the presentation of the film-concert East Atlantic that I did in collaboration with the video maker Miguel C. Tavares. I hope that everything resumes with the coming of 2021.


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RIZ Opens Up About New Single “Tribe” & More In Recent Interview

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RIZ Opens Up About New Single "Tribe" & More In Recent Interview

RIZ has always had a passion for music. His latest single, “Tribe” is a Rock/Heavy Metal masterpiece accompanied by powerful vocals. I got a chance to interview him about this song and his upcoming album, plus, some additional details related to his career. Make sure to keep up with RIZ on socials below.

1 – Was there a lot of Rock music in your house growing up?

My big brother turned me on to great bands like KISS, Black Sabbath, and Styx. But being raised in The Bronx right when and where Hip-Hop was born a lot of that influenced my music. My parents being Indian had a lot of Indian music playing and I think that influenced my sense of melody.

2 – What made you go from a psychic to an independent rock artist?

My life is a crazy story but it’s all true. I started off as a musician when I was a teenager but I was also very psychic, my senses eventually became so sharp that it became my life and I moved to LA and have been teaching meditation, workshops, and doing group psychic readings non stop for a decade: but something was always burning inside of me – my love of music especially hard rock and metal. Can’t take that out of me ever!

3 – How did your new song “Tribe” come about?

I wrote this song while in the quarantine lockdown here in LA. We couldn’t really get together to rehearse in person so we did it on Zoom and recorded all our parts in a secret studio location! I have a big tribe of friends online and wanted to write a song that represented the strong spirit of the people uniting.

4 – Do you think “Tribe” has a good message behind its lyrics?

“Tribes” lyrics are about what I believe in and what I have taught as a shaman for over a decade, that your freedom starts with your mind and your passion.

5 – Was it difficult to shot the music video?

We did this video on Zoom and then had a friend add some special fx to have fun with it. The shoot was easy, our crowd was everyone in their houses just rockin’ out to the band! Getting them all together was really my wife Oriah’s magic, she’s the director of most of my videos!


7 – Can you reveal to us some interesting details about your upcoming album, ‘The Bronx Bomber’?

This whole album was recorded during the lockdown here in LA! The good part of the lockdown was none of us could go to work so we really got to focus on our music like never before! The musicians who play with me are killers! The album drops 8/20!

8 – When is the release date of this album?

‘The Bronx Bomber’ is the name of my album which releases on August 20th this summer which is also my birthday! The term ‘Bronx Bombers’ refers to the baseball team in The Bronx, New York City where I grew up. I wasn’t a huge baseball fan but I always loved that term it was so badass!

RIZ rock music
9 – What keeps you inspired to write songs?

I can’t stop writing songs. It’s how I see life, through music. I have a wild imagination and being a psychic I’m very sensitive to my environment so ideas come to me all the time!

10 – Finally, how do you see yourself careerwise in the next 10 years?

At least 10 albums done and lots of live shows under my belt meeting our fans all around the world!


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Interview | Questions & Answers With Bobby Shann

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Interview | Questions & Answers With Bobby Shann
Bobby Shann
is an artist who is known for his outstanding productions that feature infectious grooves and steady beats that are perfect for the dancefloor. His discography includes releases such as ‘Call Me Papi’, ‘Break It Down’, and more recently a stunning collab with Blas Cordero titled ‘Double Vision’. We caught up with Bobby to find out his methods behind the music.

1 — Talk us through how you started your journey to learning how to produce?

It all began back in the days when I first got in touch with the hip-hop culture, through breakdancing. I wanted to start making my own beats and my producing career started. I just spent my time playing about with the software, I’m still learning. I think I will keep on learning; everything is a lesson.

2 — Were there any books or videos you used to help you?

Not really, I just got on with it! Nowadays there is also a lot of tutorials which can really help you out.

3 — What software do you use, and would you recommend it to beginners?

I use Ableton. As I started with more complex daw’s I would recommend Ableton even for beginners. It’s the best way to learn efficiently.


4 — Do you have any tips for finding a creative spark?

Well, I think the best way to get creative is to be yourself and not being afraid of creating what you have in your mind. Don’t ever let others’ opinions affect you. Just do your thing. That’s all I can say.

5 — Which top 3 plugins would you suggest?

To be honest the only thing I can suggest is to find out by yourself which plugins your sound fits and if this sounds good for you, then amazing! I don’t think there are any rules.

6 — What are your opinions on mixing and mastering your own tracks?

It could be good but also bad. It depends on the technical knowhow you have and especially having the ear for that. I love to see the technical aspects behind it all and learn about it. It can be fun, and you have the possibility to make the songs really sound like you want it to be. But sometimes there is also complicated parts I would wish an engineer would take all the effort. It really takes a lot of time. Sometimes it can also become annoying listening to your own track the whole time which could have a different impact on the song.


7 — How do you approach remixes?

It’s a good thing, I guess. Doing remixes is a good way to show how it would sound like working with other artists from different genres as well.

8 — What are the essential skills that a producer should work on first?

Just be yourself and do what you love don’t follow any rules you’ve heard about producing or whatever. It should sound like you. Music is the art to express yourself so do it.

9 — What piece of advice do you wish you had received in the beginning?

Oh wow, lemme think about. I guess you can always take advice from people It doesn’t matter when and how. What’s important is that you do what you want to do and have in your mind. The best process to learn is making mistakes and your own experiences.


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