Connect with us

Interviews

Interview | Questions & Answers With Swonk

Published

on

Interview | Questions & Answers With Swonk
Swonk 
really blew me away with his first ever debut single “Kicking Pavement”. Saxophones are sexy as hell and vocals are so inviting. We got a chance to speak with him about this newborn project for fans of electronic music. Please check this out!

1 – Was there any special motivation to begin this project as Swonk?

The Swonk project was something I had been considering for a while as a supplement to my other project, An Ordinary Day. On the backend I noticed that my productions were driving down two different stylistic paths, so I felt it would only be right to give them each their own placeholder.

2 – How would you describe the sound of Swonk in just one phrase?

Fast food music with fresh ingredients and seasoned with soul. ☺

3 – Are you considering taking a definitive break from your previous projects?

I still produce material that categorically fits under what An Ordinary Day is meant to be. AOD is really about allowing myself the freedom to experiment and create without putting so much emphasis on meeting a certain structure or timeline. I am planning to release under both aliases in parallel.

4 – Why is there a flying insect in the Swonk logo? What is the hidden meaning of it?

The logo is a butterfly – and to me, it’s a symbol of transformation or representative of evolution.

swonk interview
5 – Your latest collaboration with David Mason, “Kicking Pavement” is a nice electronic piece. How was it teaming with David and what went into this tune?

David is a very dedicated, hardworking, and talented guy. We had been in contact some time ago about working on a track but nothing ever transpired. Finally, he reached out with a few raw vocal demos that he was looking for collaborators on. In addition to working with David, I summoned Hugo Lee to play saxophone on the record. It was my first time doing that and it was awesome to hear how well it turned out.

6 – Did someone or something inspired you to produce it?

I really enjoyed the pop nature of the vocal, but it had enough edge that allowed me to create a few heavier moments in the track. I tried to fit my production to the vocal rather than the other way around.

7 – What do you hope listeners take away from listening to this track?

I think it touches the surface of what Swonk is all about. I don’t always aim for a particular genre, but try to fit just enough of the clichés in there to add familiarity, along with some unexpected weirdness.

8 – Are you already planning to release a second single anytime soon?

I’m always on the prowl for my next collaboration and have several works in progress. I’m hoping to release another track in the next few months, but I also have never been one to force it.

swonk studio
9 – Have you considered remixing for other artists under the alias of Swonk?

Definitely. I often find that doing remixes are a quick way to gain inspiration. From a legal stance it’s easier to gain clearance by working with independent artists, but I’ve also considered remixing bigger artists as a demonstration of what I am able to do.

10 – Finally, is there anything else you would like to add?

The typical – follow me on all of my social networks. Subscribe to my Youtube and add Kicking Pavement to your Spotify playlists!


CONNECT WITH SWONK NOW!

Facebook
Twitter
SoundCloud
Spotify
Youtube
Instagram

Hi, my name is Erick Ycaza. I have a BA in Advertising & Graphic Design. This blog is to provide you with daily music news and share my personal style.

Interviews

Exclusive Interview: Van Hechter On Catchy Album, ‘Love Elastic’

Published

on

Van Hechter

The catchy album ‘Love Elastic’ by Montreal-based singer Van Hechter is a singable collection of 7 Electro-Pop and Disco gems. It is absurdly underrated to the mainstream media and deserves way more attention. Not to mention, the artist felt inspired by the feeling of love and its amplitude meanings. Learn more about his second record below. Happy reading!

1 — Where did you get the album name ‘Love Elastic’ from?

It came from my own reality and a personal belief that true love is not possessive, and has no ego. When you want someone’s best – you simply can’t get in the way of their life’s dream… So I set a wonderful human free-regardless on my own little sadness. Nothing is broken. Just now we can’t be together; ”Love Elastic”…

2 — Which singers or bands musically inspired you?

My mom was a huge fan of popular culture, especially music. I grew up listening to Disco, Motown, Jazz, Punk… Biggest influences; Giorgio Moroder (Donna Summer’s era especially), Sylver Convention, Bowie, Blondie, Sex Pistols, the Supremes, and Bing Crosby! LOL, mash all that up hahaha!

3 — What themes revolve around this record?

It’s a celebration of love in all its forms; passion, friendship, brotherhood, romance, lust, the love of nature, and our planet, too (”Fuck The Disco” is about the environment).

4 — How was the writing process? Do you have a favorite place to write lyrics?

My associate/business partner/good friend and I worked over text messages. I travel. He has the wife, house, garden, dogs, mostly stays put… So we often just do it like that; ”Hey I have this idea, love is like an elastic — I’d want it to be really repetitive ”I found a love”— think pop with horns”… Then he’ll send a snippet of music and we build from there.

5 — Have you kept writing in lockdown?

It’s been hard. I came up with my next album’s concept. I wrote a few bits but I haven’t been all that productive in terms of creation. I worked out every single day, I tried to keep my spirits up regardless of all the sad news we were fed daily, checked in on my neighbor… I couldn’t bring myself to doing more.

Van Hechter Interview
6 — What makes this album different from your debut material ‘Van Unlikely’?

I’d say we’ve gone from Electro-Pop to just Pop! And Pop that one can dance to, too…

7 — What genre of music do you identify with? Why?

Anything linked to Disco even when this is far fetched; I’m your man.

8 — Are you vocally trained? Is this still important in today’s music industry?

I am. I studied opera and hated it. Then I did a 180, joined a punk band. I wanted to train myself to shout, not to modulate! LOL!

van hechter music
9 — Are you doing any planning for live performances?

I canceled 8 trips to NYC, 2 to Florida, and 30 dates in Europe were dropped. One thing I can tell you; I will be singing at The Stonewall Inn alongside my good friend DJ Chauncey Dandridge on New Year’s Eve if I have to swim there from Montreal! I REFUSE to cancel that one!

10 — What does the future hold for Van Hechter artist wise?

Well, next June I am launching an album of duets with DJ Chauncey Dandridge, all about the Stonewall Inn, the gay liberation movement, where we’re at now (in my perspective of course — I don’t claim to have answers)… This just came about out of friendship. I love this guy. And I find he doesn’t get the credit he deserves, he is one of NYC’s best DJ’s so polyvalent. By now he should have awards lined up on his shelves!

Then in 2022, I will launch a new solo album. I love the title, I love the direction. I think it’s going to be fantastic. I am aiming for an early Spring.


CONNECT WITH VAN HECHTER NOW!

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

Continue Reading

Interviews

Interview | Questions & Answers With Now Endeavor

Published

on

now endeavor

Now Endeavor‘s energetic Indie Pop visuals are very popular on YouTube. I talked with Pete and Thom to know more about their great music project. Recently, the “You Know Me” clip finds them on the road, driving blithely through a world of peril, and staying as optimistic as possible in challenging times. Scroll down and read this interview!

1 –When did you start writing and composing songs together?

Thom: The first song we wrote together was AC’s “Not Working Right”. I had just parted with a band I was in, and I wanted to do a solo project. I wrote a tune, and I always give my tunes prototype names, which happened to be AC’s “Not Working Right” that time! I was having a hard time writing a vocal melody and lyrics, so I brought it to Pete. He said, “Oh this is awesome!” He came back with a vocal melody and lyrics about a date going horribly, and on top of that, the AC is not working right! I thought why don’t we write more songs?

Just Pete: The exact date escapes me, but Thom is right. Our first song together was AC’s “Not Working Right”.

2 – How have you tried to remain active artistically while in quarantine?

Thom: I’ve been trying to write a ton of songs about random things. I once told a bandmate that I could write a song about anything! Even when I’m not feeling it, I’ll write a super simple song. When I have all of those ideas recorded, I find I can reuse them later and mix the old ideas into new ones. If the idea I came up with is trash, it can stay buried!

Just Pete: It’s easier now. More time to myself to create whenever I want. We’re experiencing unprecedented events which makes way for unprecedented art.

3 –Which singers or bands inspire you to create music?

Thom: That really changes from time to time. I can tell you that recently I wrote three different songs that were inspired by Sufjan Stevens, Phil Collins, and James Taylor. I honestly just go down my playlist on Spotify and say “I like what he/she/they did there.” I learn to play a few of an artist’s songs, and then it feels like you absorb their technique and style. Then you can incorporate the pieces of their style you like into your writing. It’s like…when Kirby inhales someone and gets a power haha. Once I send it to Pete, it takes a whole new direction.

Just Pete: I like Donell Jones, Trey Songz, Michael Jackson and a bunch of others that would take too long to mention.

4 – What is the indie music scene like in Detroit?

Thom: I’ve actually been living in California for a few years, so Pete might know a bit more. When I was younger I played at a lot of music venues Downriver. It’s kind of hard to explain what Downriver is if you aren’t from Southeast Michigan, but it’s more or less a region south of Detroit extending toward Ohio. A lot of the places I used to play at are closed now. The Modern Exchange was where I played my first show. It’s not around anymore.

Just Pete: El Club in Detroit and the Blind Pig in Ann Arbor are some hot spots for Indie music. The indie music scene in Detroit has always been strong. Remember House music has strong roots here too.

Now Endeavor Interview
5 – Which is your favorite place to perform music?

Thom: We haven’t played a live show in a while, but I’d love to perform at Campus Martius Park in Detroit. One year, Saves The Day performed there, and it was a great experience for me. I went with two friends, but we were running late. All three of us sprinted the entire way there from a parking lot that was like 5 minutes away. I missed a song I think, but I loved the weather and the atmosphere. It would be great to play there.

Just Pete: Anywhere that makes the audience comfortable.

6 – Tell us about your new single, “You Know Me”, is it about positive thinking?

Thom: To me, it’s definitely about positive thinking. You want to let go of the bitterness that you have in things that didn’t work out. That frees you mentally to start new things. That’s easier said than done because we’re emotional creatures that can get hung up on being wronged.

Just Pete: It’s all about positive thinking. It can take you farther than you think.

7 – Is positive thinking delusional?

Thom: Hell yes! But I think you have to be delusional to make it in the music industry. As a musician, you’re thinking, “… The industry changes so quickly… It’s also very saturated because of the internet… It’s so hard to get a following… Even if someone likes one of your songs, they may forget to look it up! Potential fan lost forever!…What if people don’t like the music I spent so hard working on?…” If I sat down and thought about those things all of the time, I’d lose my mind and my nerve. It doesn’t mean those things aren’t potentially true or an issue, but you definitely have to delude yourself a bit or you’d go insane.

Just Pete: Sure, but so is negative thinking.

8 – What do you recommend to increase positive thinking?

Thom: I think visualizing what you want and dreaming about it is the best approach. You can trick your brain into believing in your goals, even if YOU don’t really believe it at first. It sounds kind of silly, but that’s one way I dealt with anxiety in the past. I’d remind myself that I wasn’t in any danger, and then I’d make myself smile. I just had to visualize my safety and happiness. It sounds a little crazy, because I am, but also… it works combined with other techniques.

Just Pete: Just enjoy simple pleasures. Make a list of the things you CAN do and forget about what you think you can’t do.

9 – I’m loving the animated video of “You Know Me”. How much of the creative process were you involved with it?

Thom: I’m not much of an artist when it comes to physical art. I skipped art class in high school and took a music class instead, so I didn’t actually contribute to the design with my own skills. I had an idea for what I wanted and took it to an animator. I wanted the video to be a straight forward, feel-good idea. The animator I worked with did a fantastic job of capturing what I had in my head!

Just Pete: I wrote the song but Thom had all the ideas for the visuals.

10 – Are you already working on your next single?

Thom: I’m always writing! I don’t think I ever write with a single in mind anymore though. We have a few demos written at the moment. You have to see how songs sound after they have been recorded. I’ve written songs that I wasn’t in love with at first that were recorded on my phone as an idea, but after a little production, I was like “That’s it! That’s the song I want to push.” So we will see!

Just Pete: Oh yeah. There’s a bunch of songs to sift through.


FOLLOW NOW ENDEAVOR

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

Continue Reading

Interviews

A Household Name In The Making, Get To Know Centineo

Published

on

Centineo

Meet the past, present, and future of Centineo in this exclusive interview. There’s no doubt, the multi-faceted brothers Tim and Rob are rising talents in the global dance music scene. It should be highlighted they produce, sing, and write their own upbeat tracks. Top-notch compositions with Pop sensibilities are their specialty. Learn more here.

1 – First of all, what made you decide to form a duo?

It happened very naturally, we’re both very musical and taught ourselves how to play multiple instruments. Rob had been more into rock/punk music and Tim was writing songs/raps early on, but we both got into dance music and the scene around the same time – showing each other songs and artists we discovered, etc. Sharing the same genetics, we both had similar tastes and it just naturally progressed from being listeners to want to learn production and create our own music together.

2 – What does the name Centineo mean?

Centineo (Cent-In-Ayo) is our last name – it’s of Italian origin. We’re told by our relatives that it means “hundreds of beautiful flaws”.

3 – Do you remember the first piece of equipment you bought for this project?

The first purchase we made was a Windows Desktop and the software “Mixcraft”. We’ve upgraded to Ableton and Mac computers since then.


4 – How do you deal with arguments or decisions during the production process of a new song?

Both of us are musicians and producers but Tim has more of an executive role in terms of musical/creative decisions. He’s an incredible talent with a great ear and sharp musical instincts – he almost always gets it right. Rob prefers to be more behind the scenes but he’s a tech- wizard engineer with degrees in music theory and audio production. When we have different opinions, we both write/present our own ideas and hash out which one we think works best.

5 – What about songwriting? Who is responsible for writing the lyrics?

Tim is our primary songwriter. He writes the lyrics himself and moving forward will be the featured vocalist performing them as well. Rob is the only set of ears/opinions I trust during the writing process. He always gives me critical feedback and helps me bring the song home.

6 – What are the benefits of working together as brothers? Is anyone else in your family musical?

The best part of working with your brother is how honest you can be. If an idea sucks or someone has a strong opinion – there’s no holding back, no judgment and no one’s feelings get hurt. Whether it be making music or business decisions – the degree of trust we have provides a great environment for creating and being comfortable/vulnerable.

Our family is full of creatives in the music & entertainment industry. Our cousin JoJo Centineo is an extremely talented producer and recording engineer, and our cousin Noah Centineo is a Netflix/Movie star. There’s a lot of creative talent in our family.

7 – Where can we stream your latest single? Why should we listen to it?

We’ve released multiple remixes more recently that are available on our Soundcloud, but our last single was ‘Otherside’ released on Revealed Recordings. You can listen to it on any major streaming platform of your choosing (Spotify, Apple Music, etc.)

“Otherside” is an emotionally charged story about conquering fear, mental health, and injustice with love. Something that is critical and very relevant given the state of the world today. It’s also a great introduction and indication of the music we are releasing soon:
BIG and emotional.

8 – Big names in the industry like David Guetta and Hardwell have praised your tracks. What’s the key to reaching success in this competitive industry?

We wish we could be more helpful but there’s no sexy answer/real secret to success.

It’s multi-faceted but simply put: You need to work your ass off relentlessly, never give up and ignore the competition – Focus on yourself. There are a lot of skills necessary to be successful in the industry: technical ability, artistic ability, and last but not least business/administrative ability. All of which require a lot of time, hard work, sacrifice, practice, and failure to develop.

Our advice would be to have patience in the pursuit of developing these skills, trust the process, surround yourself with the right people and believe in yourself delusionally while having the awareness and perspective necessary to make good decisions.


9 – Do you live together? What’s an average day like for you?

At the moment we don’t (Tim in FL, Rob in NJ) but we have plans to live together in the near future. (Tim) An average day for me consists of working on music all day. Whether it be production, writing, or administrative – I don’t leave my home studio, or as everyone who knows me likes to call it, the “cave”. I lock myself in my studio and take breaks to workout, eat, and occasionally relax on the beach/by the pool with family & friends. I’m also a huge movie buff so I always find a way to sneak a movie in before bed.

(Rob) I spend most of my day in front of a computer – writing, mixing, and drinking coffee (My coffee cup is always full). If I’m not at my desk I’m somewhere in my apartment with a guitar in hand. How I spend my day really depends on where I draw inspiration from. I consider myself forever a student of music. I educate myself and expand my knowledge in as many aspects of music as possible. When I need a break – I love to cook, hit the gym, and dive into new synths and plugins.

Despite this quarantine and global pandemic, our lifestyles haven’t changed much and we’re not sure whether to be concerned or impressed. We’ve been social distancing for years now!

10 – Tell us more about Centineo’s upcoming plans or ideas for the next months.

So, we took a break from releasing music for the entire 2019 calendar year. Despite the fact that our music was being received well and supported – it wasn’t enough. Something was missing.

We felt like we were chasing validation (support and label releases). We realized we would never get to where we wanted to be if we just waited in line with everyone else relying on the gatekeepers/bigger names & labels to make it happen for us. This became glaringly obvious after two separate events: First, we submitted a track to a major label for signing (*which we had already received huge support on) and after weeks of waiting for a response, we were told, “Your hi-hat is too loud, pass.” Second, A great conversation we had with an executive at a major label who told us, “I’ll tell you a secret that no one else will – the labels will only want you when you don’t need them”.

This was as eye-opening as it was invaluable. It became very clear to us that in order to get to where we wanted to be, we needed a new strategy and we needed to do this on our own. Artistry should never be about pandering or compromising your expression, let alone giving someone who could care less about you, power, and influence over your work. Now more than ever, it’s possible to be a successful independent artist – and after those interactions, we spent the next year and a half strategizing, building our brand, developing our voice/product, and becoming self-sufficient.

On top of all that, we want to connect with people in a more meaningful way than just music that they party to. We want to bridge the disconnect of being an “EDM” producer and being considered a true musician/artist in the eyes of the listener. In an industry where the shelf life of a song is a handful of weeks, we also want our music to have longevity, to truly touch and impact people’s lives for years and years to come. Artists like Axwell, Sebastian Ingrosso, Steve Angello, Alesso, Martin Garrix, and Calvin Harris have been successful in doing just that with their timeless classics and crossover hits. (*See: Don’t You Worry Child, Reload, Calling, In the Name of Love, Sweet Nothing). We’re pretty sure they didn’t wait around giving a f**k about someone’s opinion of their hi-hat! The only way we were going to accomplish our goals would be by taking the time to adjust our trajectory, rethink the music, and incorporate more of ourselves into the listening experience.

In the coming months, we’ll be releasing music ranging from Progressive House all the way to Pop/R&B. All of the songs are produced by us and feature Tim as the vocalist and lyricist with the exception of one. The exception being our first release (in over a year) which is coming out very soon. It features a legendary writer and vocalist that has worked with the biggest names in the industry – it’s a bomb. We’re super proud of it and can’t wait for you to hear it.

We’re so excited to begin and share this new chapter of our journey with the world, and we hope to inspire some of our fellow artists to push themselves and follow in our footsteps. We’re confident that among the new music coming out, there is something here for everyone. Stay tuned!


CONNECT WITH CENTINEO NOW!

Website
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

Continue Reading

Interviews

Danny Spade Discusses First Original Single “Effort” — Interview

Published

on

Danny Spade

Connecticut-based producer Danny Spade just premiered “Effort”. It took him a couple of years to bring out his first original single. In short, it’s a feel-good Dance-Pop gem charged with positive energy, motivating people to be the best version of themselves. All money that is raised by the cool track will be donated to a local charity. Learn more details below in this exclusive interview with the independent artist.

1 – What has been the inspiration for your first original single, “Effort”?

I have been writing music for a pretty long time, sometimes for other people, sometimes just for fun but this song is dedicated to all the people doing their best to make it work in their relationships and going through all those ups and downs. At its core, the song is about being able to bring your best self to something you love!

GRAB YOUR COPY

2 – I’m happy to know it’s actually a charity song, please tell us more about it.

Al’s Angels, an organization that is near and dear to my heart. Something I have participated in over the years with my many friends and family members. This charity provides support to children and families battling cancer, rare blood diseases, natural disasters, and severe financial hardship. I have personally seen how this organization has made an impact. Coupled with my desire to truly do something good in the world, I decided that I would release this as my first single and donate 100% of the proceeds to the organization.

3 – Why did you decide to work with Danyka Nadeau & Vince Is DEAD on vocals?

I was always a fan of Danyka’s contributions to the music community. When I heard her demo, I immediately knew she was the right fit. I first met Chris while I was working as a Sales Representative for Guitar Center. He showed me some of his work and almost like a lightning bolt of destiny, I knew that these two amazing vocalists would create a work of art that was exactly what I had envisioned for the song.

Danny Spade Interview
4 – Do you believe this song will resonate with listeners?

Yes, I do believe it will resonate with many people! Come on, how many times have we all been in a relationship where we didn’t know where it would go or maybe we would get into a fight but in the end, it would all work out for the better. I truly hope that this song reaches someone who needs to hear it and that they feel that they are not alone because hey, we’ve all been there. 🙂

5 – What are some of the themes you would like to express in your upcoming releases?

I know you reading this will probably find it so corny, but, love! Love, unity, and togetherness. All of us are very different from one another and oftentimes we can lose sight of that. What makes us special is our differences. This song isn’t only about just relationships, it is the “Effort” to make yourself the best person you can be so you can give it to the world.

6 – What were some challenges you face in the recording studio?

I gotta be honest, writing music really is not easy. Making little doodles in your Daw is always fun but making something that gets you up and dancing around is what we all live for! I have so many other friends who are constantly in the news about some great accomplishment that they have in the music world. It gets discouraging at times when you see all this success around you, no matter how happy you are for them, and you ask yourself how can I be a part of that? My goal is not to be the next Skrillex or Tiesto but rather, just to be the first me. I am just a regular dude who wanted to make something I really wanted to hear!

Danny Spade Effort
7 – How long did it take you to complete this project?

4 Years. This took me 4 years from me making this song to finally bringing this to you. Yes, I know you are probably thinking, “wait, this song took you 4 years to make!?” Unfortunately, yes. Technically the song itself only took me a few months but after it was done, I selfishly did not want to share it with anyone. I loved the way it made me feel and the work I had put into it was so very personal. I was afraid if I shared it with the world that people may not like it. Once though COVID-19 came and changed all of our lives, I realized that this song was no longer mine to keep and it belonged to everybody.

8 – I remember in 2016, you did an Electro House remix for KSHMR. Today you surprise us with an Electro-Pop track, why did you decide to delve into this change of sound?

That was a fun one, wasn’t it? I will always have a very special place in my heart for Electro House and Bass Music but my real passion is Pop Music. Most people will never know who actually produced some of their favorite music when it is played out on the radio. The music that you listen to every day on repeat when you are going to work or coming home from school. People will always know the name “Justin Bieber” or “Post Malone” but they may never know “The Audibles” or “Louis Bell”. I hope to one day be an addition to that fine list of creators.

9 – Can you give us more details about the lyric video you will premiere soon?

Of course! It’s going to be an animated music lyric video. Something hopefully everyone can watch and sing along to. The imagery and representation of the video perfectly capture what Danyka and Chris sing about so I am just really hoping people connect with that. I think it is a super awesome video, I hope you enjoy it!

10 – Finally, how do you see Danny Spade in the next 5 years?

I wish to gain some sort of credibility within the music world so that I may become a teacher and pass on what I have learned. Music creation is becoming increasingly more popular and a lot of times people don’t know where to turn in order to get to the finish line. I hope to be that light guiding person to their dream and be able to help in any way I can. At the end of the day, I am just a guy trying to do the right thing and if you got anything from this interview, it’s that we are all here to do something special. I hope to be one of the people who can help you to get there! Peace and love – Danny Spade.


CONNECT NOW WITH DANNY SPADE!

Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
Website

Continue Reading

Interviews

Full Interview Out Now, Munatix Will Release “You Just Keep Hanging On”

Published

on

Full Interview Out Now, Munatix Release "You Just Keep Hanging On"
“You Just Keep Hanging On”
by Munatix is a classic SynthPop song for the 21st-century generation to be released on July 31st. Music acts like Erasure, Giorgio Moroder, and Chromeo were the source of inspiration behind this great tune. Obviously, it was produced in a contemporary way to make it sound fresh. Learn more about this Belgian duo and their new single in this exclusive interview with one of its members, Josh Sleurs.

1 — I’m loving your new single, “You Just Keep Hanging On”, how many synths did you use for this tune?

The song started out as a bunch of chords that evolved towards a song by adding a piano melody. Then I started stacking the synth sounds and left out the piano in the end. The lyrics followed later.

The first synth line added was the MiniMoog bass. To make it exciting, we added a phaser and an evolving digital delay. Giorgio Moroder used this type of delay a lot on his Disco records. So, how many… including the drum computer, about 6 instruments.

2 — Personally, I think it’s a highly singable song. Are you planning to drop a lyric video?

The song has a melody and lyrics with meaning. These days it is popular to make lyric videos. So, it would be a logical thing to do. However, every single release is an opportunity for us to show ourselves. We want people to know who we are, what we look like, and what we stand for. Doing a video shoot for a new single is a great opportunity to do that. Currently, we are editing the video. The video will be released onto YouTube, a week after the single release.

3 — What message are you trying to send to your fans about relationships?

Well, the song is about long-distance relationships. Through social media, we are always connected every minute of the day. We just have to push a button on our smartphone and we are there. We don’t even have to dial a number.

Do you want to share an impression of the location you are at? Just make a picture and send it, instantly. This can make you feel close to a person, even if there is a physical distance. The song describes what that feels like. Being always connected but missing the physical contact.


4 — How did you learn to produce vintage-like music?

I started music when I was seven, I play synths since I was 9. That was the mid-eighties when bands using synths were revolutionary. My musical taste was formed in that era.

The synths from that era sound warm, phat, organic, lush, name it…, they just sound great. I lived through the digitization of electronic music instruments by the end of the ’80s and the ’90s. During the last 20 years, synth companies went through a lot of effort virtualizing the vintage analog sound in a digital way. In the last 10 years, there even is an enormous revival in analog electronic instruments.

Vintage analog synths are reissued, cloned in different ways. That means there is a lot of demand for that vintage sound. So the love for that sound, by musicians in general, never went away.

I remember playing a virtual software version of the Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 synthesizer in a music store 20 years ago. I fell in love immediately. I never had the opportunity to play that beloved and expensive original instrument. The software version got me acquainted with it. But I wanted the real thing. I wanted to be able to really play that instrument, touch it with my fingers, experience the presence, and see how it reacts to me when I turn the knobs.

Munatix interview
My love for these vintage synths combined with my love for melody, harmonies, and classic song structures make our retro sound. Still the producing part is not retro. We use a modern computer with the latest software for recording with a bunch of virtual plug-ins for processing. We try to make it sound also contemporary in a way.

On our first single, “The Rhythm Sets My Heart On Fire” most of the sounds were coming from software synths. To come back to your question. Today everything is on YouTube. Martin Garrix showed us behind his desk how he made his groundbreaking track ‘Animals’. Avicii modestly shared some of his secrets in a YouTube video. You just have to take the time to watch it. We can just learn from the masters themselves online. We don’t have to go to school anymore. We just look online for what we need and take it in.

5 — Synthpop is a culture, not music. Do you agree or disagree?

I am convinced people do not only listen to music because of the music itself, but also the aura surrounding it. When you look at Synthwave, that has become a culture. It comes along with art, fashion, lifestyle. So I think you can call Synthwave a culture.

I think for Synthpop maybe this is less prominent. In history, there were a lot of branches from Synthpop where it was more prominent if you talk about New Wave for instance. But it is not always easy to box music into a category. We think we make ‘Synthpop’ because we use ‘synths’ and want to make ‘Pop’ music. So that is a logic contraction. However “Groovin’ Is My Hobby” appeared in a lot of Synthwave playlists on Spotify. Some people like to call our music ‘Electro-Pop’. I do not always know what the exact outlines are for those categories.

6 — A lot of fans have a nostalgic connection with your music. Are you afraid of taking a new sonic direction?

We want to make music that feels good to us, set out our own path, and follow that. Of course, we hope to find our audience that likes our music. Trying something new can be a risk. But if you do what you are passionate about, I think we will radiate that passion towards our listeners.

Ricky and I have a guitar Rock song in the store that we want to release in the future that reminds of the style of AC/DC. We still want to mix in some synths, but it will remain a Rock song. So we might have surprises up our sleeves.

7 — Besides composing your own tracks, what kind of services do you offer to the public as a production duo?, Are you open to collaborations?

In order to realize the goals we really need to focus on priorities. Since we are indie musicians and do the whole process of writing and releasing ourselves, there is not much time left. The past months, 4 remixes of Munatix songs, made by fellow musicians came out, which we think is nice. To do remixes ourselves, or do collaborations, that would be too distracting at this moment. Our first priority is to write an hour of music so we can start gigging. “You Just Keep Hanging On” is our fifth single, so we still have some work to do.

8 — Which artists have you been listening to in Lockdown?

I discover new music via the Spotify Discovery Weekly playlist now. My recent discoveries are DJ Storken, with “Lille Vals” and Rex The Dog, with “Do You Feel What I Feel”. Also, I have been listening a lot to the Pur Zynth’s Synthwave playlists and the ‘Synthpop Your World’ playlist. Other than that, I think the new Erasure album coming out sounds promising.

9 — Can we expect a new Munatix album for 2020? If so, tell us more about it.

At a rate of releasing 3 singles a year, 2020 will be too soon. We aim for 2022. Until now we have done a video for each release. Organizing that and editing the video almost takes as much time as making the music itself. But it is fun to do.

10 — Any words of advice for those newbie talents who want to dive into the world of synths?

Gear has become relatively cheap and choices are plenty. Good sound has been democratized and is now available to almost everybody. That means everybody can take their shot at making music. If you like vintage synth sounds and tweaking hardware you can start out with some Behringer vintage synth clones. A 400$ analog hardware MiniMoog clone was unimaginable 10 years ago. We live in exciting times.


CONNECT WITH MUNATIX NOW!

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

Continue Reading

FOLLOW US!

Artists Of The Week

Trending

Copyright © 2007 Electro Wow - New Music Every Day!

HEY YOU! 

Stay updated with the latest Electronic Music News, Interviews & Discounts

JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER!

Thank You for Subscription!